Executive Function Strategies Blog

Why Our Words Matter to Struggling Students

When I was little, I can remember being told the old adage, “Sticks and stones will break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” While I understand that it was meant to encourage me and to make me feel better when someone had said mean words to me, as an adult and as an educator, I now find that phrase a little dishonest. Words have meaning and they can - and do -hurt. But words can also encourage and support, and so I advocate being mindful of the kind of language that we use around our students.



Why Do Gifted Students Often Struggle in School?

School should be easy for a child who is gifted, right? On the surface, that's a simple answer: "Of course!" But if we take a closer look at a typical school experience for a gifted child, we often see some version of the following scenario...



Coordinating Care When a Child Has OCD

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Martin Franklin, Ph.D., clinical director of Rogers Behavioral Health in Philadelphia. Please read more about Dr. Franklin below.

Children with obsessive-compulsive (OCD) and anxiety disorders often struggle in school. Parents who want to help their children are often at a loss as to what to do: Should we speak to school officials? Should we seek an IEP or a 504 plan? Would accommodations in terms of reducing workload or avoiding certain classes or tasks help? Parents may also wonder if they should keep it to themselves because of the stigma still associated with mental health issues.

While there is no “one size fits all” solution, there are some things parents can do.  



Are You Setting Up Your High School Student for College Success?

College freshmen don't always go on to become college seniors. In fact, according to CollegeAtlas.org, 30% of students don't return after their freshman year.

That's a startling statistic to grasp for any parent of a high school student. What's behind those numbers? How can a parent ensure their soon-to-be young adult won't be in that 30% who don't make it to sophomore year?