Executive Function Strategies Blog

5 Ways to Bring Peace and Positivity to Homework Battles

Editor’s note: This week, we feature guest blogger Joanna Robin, Ph.D., of Bright Parenting. Please read more about Joanna below. 

When kids struggle to do their homework, it can stir up so many emotions in parents. Maybe you were the type of student who got your homework done right away and you didn’t have anxiety about homework—until now, when you see your own child struggling. Or maybe you’re putting pressure on yourself to help your child stay on track because as an adult, you understand what’s at stake. You have the perspective to know that doing well academically can mean more opportunities for your kid later.  

And yet...you can’t force your child solve the math problem or complete the science lab.



Time for Bed! Why Sleep is Essential for Executive Functioning

“But I don’t want to go to bed!”  Pretty much every parent has heard these words, or some variation, as early as...well, my three-year old says it, so let’s go with that. Usually one more story suffices at this age, but as children get older, the pleas often become more difficult to navigate.



How Do We Connect Student Evaluation With Meaningful Intervention?

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest bloggers Mandi Croft-Petoskey and Amanda Moons of Neuro Educational Specialists. Please read more about Mandi and Amanda below.



6 Steps to Successful Goal Setting for Students (and Adults!)

Did you ever notice that September, the beginning of the school year for most students, shares something in common with January, the beginning of the calendar year? Both present a great opportunity to start anew, wipe the slate clean, and make positive changes. For some of us, these starting points might inspire setting goals for fitness, knowledge, or skills we’d like to acquire. For students, the new school year offers opportunities to reflect and to set their own goals for how they’ll improve their approach to schoolwork. And like many of us, those goals we set often start off strong - but without a real plan for how to attain them they sink to the bottom of our priorities and rise again the next year as the very same goal. How can parents - as well as students - start off strong and persist in seeing our goals through?