Executive Function Strategies Blog

How to Support Your Child With Attention Challenges, Especially Now

Editor’s note: This week, we feature guest blogger Dr. Jane Greenstein, a licensed psychologist in MA. Please read more about Dr. Greenstein below.

These are difficult times for everyone. Between coronavirus fears, quarantine, school closings, and financial uncertainty, we are in uncharted territory. It’s hard to manage worries about the future when so much is unknown. It’s hard maintaining a sense of normalcy when we have lost the structures of our typical lives. It’s hard juggling responsibilities for ourselves, our households, and (if we are fortunate) our jobs.  For those with children in the home, you have to do this while also looking after their physical, emotional, and intellectual well-being. And for caregivers of children and teens with significant attention control weakness, this already demanding reality is made more challenging by the degree of support your kid needs to complete tasks, even under the best of circumstances. 



3 Tips for Thriving in Online College Classes

Remember your college experience? Routine was key. Going to class each day, meeting on campus for group projects, and studying in the library were all staples in the life of an undergraduate. With the unfolding COVID-19 pandemic, those college rituals have been disrupted. Now, millions of college students are finding themselves struggling to meet the demands of a course load that’s far less structured and entirely online.



How to Get Your Head Into WFH (Work From Home) Mode: 4 Essential Tips

As a college teacher, I’ve kept a weird work schedule for the past 10 years. Until the current school closures with the COVID-19 situation, I would physically go to work to teach my classes, hold office hour appointments, and attend meetings. But a significant portion of the work - such as grading papers - is work I did at home alone.



The Anxious Middle Schooler: An Executive Function Connection

Middle school. For some of us, those three syllables can elicit chills of recalling social slights, embarrassing faux pas, and other growing pains of adolescence. Decades later, things haven’t changed much. In fact, it’s still about lunchtime and who you manage to sit near. As if that whole scene isn’t stressful enough, add in Executive Function challenges for a 6th, 7th, or 8th grader and you can see why kids this age can be a ball of anxiety. Heck, elementary school was a piece of cake compared to this new setting. Now they’ve got all these different teachers who talk so fast and seem to expect you to just know how to do stuff like take notes and reach out for extra help. Let’s follow a student who is having a tough time in middle school and see how some Executive Function tools might help calm the stormy seas a bit.