Executive Function Strategies Blog

Ellen Braaten

Ellen Braaten

Dr. Ellen Braaten is associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program (LEAP) at MGH, and an associate professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Braaten received her M.A. in clinical psychology from the University of Colorado, and her Ph.D. in psychology from Colorado State University. Dr. Braaten is widely recognized as an expert in the field of pediatric neuropsychological and psychological assessment, particularly in the areas of assessing learning disabilities and attention disorders. She has published numerous papers, chapters, and reviews on ADHD, learning disabilities, gender and psychopathology, intelligence and neuropsychology, and psychological assessment of children. Dr. Braaten is the co-author of Straight Talk about Psychological Testing for Kids, a book that has become a classic for parents and professionals. She also wrote The Child Clinician’s Report Writing Handbook, which has been called “the most comprehensive child assessment handbook available.” In 2010 she published How to Find Mental Health Care for Your Child, and most recently co-authored Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up, a book for parents that addresses slow processing speed in children.

Recent Posts by Ellen Braaten:

4 Tips for Coping With Slow Processing Speed in Children

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Dr. Ellen Braaten, associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital. This is part two of her series on slow processing speed. Read her full bio below.



Bright Kids Who Can’t Keep Up: The Cost of Slow Processing Speed

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Dr. Ellen Braaten, associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital. Read her full bio below.

Some kids are naturally fast. They run, talk, complete homework assignments and do all sorts of things at a rate that seems appropriate for their age. Other kids don’t, or perhaps it would be fairer to say they can’t. These are kids who may have what are called processing speed deficits. In my work as a child psychologist who specializes in pediatric neuropsychology, it seems as if I’m evaluating more kids with processing speed deficits every year. In conversations with other professionals around the country, many tell me they are experiencing the same trend. Is this a real increase in the population at large?