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Executive Function Strategies Blog

How Do I Parent My Child Who has ADHD? One Mom’s Story

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Mamie Rand, a mom whose son benefits from Executive Function coaching. Please see her full bio below.

Perhaps this recent scene in my household sounds a little familiar to you…

“Son, check your watch. What time does it say?”

“4:00, Mom!” He is exasperated that I’m about to issue a curfew.  

“I must see you home at 5:33 because we have a commitment. You got that?”

“Got it!” he yells running out the door.  

I feel sure he won’t be back on time, but I’m hopeful. 5:33 comes and goes. 5:45 does too. And then 6:00. It’s no surprise really - just frustrating to the max.



A Day in the Life of a 10th Grader with Executive Function Challenges

Morning Mad Dash: 6:57 AM - Scrambling Out the Door

Olivia has to catch the bus at 7:30, and she likes to sleep in until 6:45 … and maybe hit the snooze button one or two times after that. That leaves her about half an hour to madly dash about the house eating breakfast, choosing an outfit, brushing her teeth, packing her lunch, changing after reconsidering her outfit, texting her friends, returning to the original outfit, and - if time allows - packing her homework from the night before. With this routine, Olivia has felt frustrated a few times when - despite assuring her teachers that she really, totally did the homework the night before - she hasn’t been able to actually turn it in and get credit.



The ABCs of Reducing Anxiety for Students Going Back to School

We’ve all had that surge of nervous energy as a big event is coming up and learning to control the jitters, or emotionally regulate, can be a challenge for both students and adults. As the start of the school year approaches, you might notice anxiety building as your child anticipates new teachers, a new schedule, and the other big changes. Let’s explore some ABCs of reducing anxiety from a coaching perspective that can help smooth out the bumps during these transition times for students.



How to Have a More Successful Semester at College this Fall

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Elizabeth Hamblet, a learning consultant in Columbia University’s disability services office. Please see her full bio below.

“I honestly don’t know.” The student is looking at a grid showing the days of the week broken into hour blocks that she’s filled in with her classes, sleeping and meal times, and rehearsals. This is her response when I ask her what she did in all of those empty blocks representing unscheduled time instead of her work. And it’s true – she really doesn’t know how she spent those free hours. I get it.