Executive Function Strategies Blog

Time Management Tip: The Unschedule

Whenever I am working with someone on creating a schedule, I always get asked the same question, “Should I add activities that are not related to school or work?”

My answer is always a resounding, “Absolutely!”



Why Our Words Matter to Struggling Students

When I was little, I can remember being told the old adage, “Sticks and stones will break my bones, but words will never hurt me.” While I understand that it was meant to encourage me and to make me feel better when someone had said mean words to me, as an adult and as an educator, I now find that phrase a little dishonest. Words have meaning and they can - and do -hurt. But words can also encourage and support, and so I advocate being mindful of the kind of language that we use around our students.



Why Do Gifted Students Often Struggle in School?

School should be easy for a child who is gifted, right? On the surface, that's a simple answer: "Of course!" But if we take a closer look at a typical school experience for a gifted child, we often see some version of the following scenario...

Imagine you are an 8th grader and that school has always been easy for you. You seemed to almost instinctively understand the material in your classes and if you didn’t, you caught on within a couple minutes. You quickly memorized facts, aced tests without ever studying (or even remembering that you had a test that day!), and most of the time you zipped through your homework while you were at school, without ever having to transport anything in your backpack.

Then one day, a few weeks into 9th grade, the material got harder.



Coordinating Care When a Child Has OCD

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Martin Franklin, Ph.D., clinical director of Rogers Behavioral Health in Philadelphia. Please read more about Dr. Franklin below.

Children with obsessive-compulsive (OCD) and anxiety disorders often struggle in school. Parents who want to help their children are often at a loss as to what to do: Should we speak to school officials? Should we seek an IEP or a 504 plan? Would accommodations in terms of reducing workload or avoiding certain classes or tasks help? Parents may also wonder if they should keep it to themselves because of the stigma still associated with mental health issues.

While there is no “one size fits all” solution, there are some things parents can do.