Executive Function Strategies Blog

Understanding Your Child's IEP: What Parents Should Know

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger The Law Office of Steven Alizio, PLLC. Please read more about Steven Alizio below.

As professionals who specialize in helping parents find the best possible support for their children with learning differences and other disabilities, our team typically hears some variation of this question every day: How do I ensure that my school district provides my child with an appropriate education?



The Life-Changing Magic of Going Analog in a Digital World

Everything these days seems to be going digital. Apps for this, websites for that, Google Home or Alexa taking up residence in our living rooms. It can be helpful for planning and keeping track of our busy lives, but can also a bit overwhelming and distracting. For those of us who prefer paper and pen as opposed to a digital calendar, using a day planner can be one of the keys to success. While pre-printed planners are great for some people (kudos to you who rock your world with one), many of us would benefit from some flexibility and control over the content, design, and set up of each page. Enter the Bullet Journal.



Creating a Finals Study Plan (and cultivating the skills for success)

Recently, a college freshman (who happens to be our founder’s daughter, Jenna) shared with us her detailed plan to get through the first finals period of her college career. What do you notice as you look at this plan?

To start, if you’re a parent, maybe you’re whispering a fervent “Thank goodness I’m done with school!” as you look at the work ahead of this student. Maybe as you look closer, you notice how each class’s major assignments are listed and color-coded. Then you’ll see how each day has benchmarks to hit and specific subtasks to be done for larger projects.



Not Ready for College? Essential Tactics for Gap Year Success

We all know the typical trajectory. It’s what most of your friends are doing: graduating high school, enjoying summer, and moving directly on to college.

But that’s not the path for you. Some of your peers know exactly what they want to be and others are just going to college because it’s the next step... and that’s fine for them. But it’s not who you are. You need some time to get out of the school grind and to reflect before jumping into another grueling four-year scholastic experience.

So you find yourself staring at a gap year and wondering to yourself: How can I make good use of this time? What can I do to make sure that I’m not in the same uncertain, up-in-the-air place next year?