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Executive Function Strategies Blog

Lindsay Schelhorn

Lindsay Schelhorn, M.S., CCC-SLP is an executive function coach and a certified speech-language pathologist. She currently works as a speech-language pathologist at the Clearway School in West Newton, MA. After completing her bachelor's degree in Psychology at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania, Lindsay completed a graduate certificate in Autism Studies at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. She graduated from Mass General Hospital’s Institute of Health Professions with her degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She feels passionately about guiding teenagers and young adults to becoming more independent by increasing their confidence in functional skills, and teaching them strategies to increase their understanding and awareness of the relationship between social skills and executive functioning skills.

Recent Posts by Lindsay Schelhorn:

Overcoming End of School Year Procrastination & Lack of Motivation

"Help! My child has senioritis — and she's only a freshman (or a 7th grader, or a 4th grader...)!"

Has your child spent hours staring at a piece of paper, futilely attempting to start some dreaded piece of homework? Has your daughter declared that she is “so over school"?



The Top 3 Executive Function Apps in My Coaching Toolbox

“What are good apps I should get for my phone?”



A Speech-Language Pathologist's Approach to Academic Coaching

Have you ever given your child a direction that is met with a blank stare or an excessive delay before he or she follows it?

Does it happen even after you make sure that the Candy Crush game is put away and you have your child's undivided attention? It might not be that he or she is ignoring your request; it may actually be a reflection of your child's ability to process the language used before he or she can initiate or complete the task. Receptive language (the ability to comprehend language, or follow directions) and expressive language abilities (the ability to formulate language to complete written or spoken academic work) are inextricably linked with executive function skills.