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Executive Function Strategies Blog

3 Tips for Parents Worried about Executive Function Challenges

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Dr. Joseph Moldover, a clinical psychologist with a private practice in Wellesley, MA. Read his full bio below.

Uncertainty is one thing that is guaranteed to create anxiety. Uncertainty can come from several different places for parents who find out that their child is struggling with executive function challenges. Let's explore 3 main concerns I commonly hear from parents I work with - and 3 ways to address those worries.



What is Pediatric Neuropsychology?

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Laura Jansons, Psy D. Please read her full bio below.

According to the American Psychological Association, Pediatric Neuropsychology is a professional specialty concerned with learning and behavior in relationship to a child’s brain. A pediatric neuropsychologist is a licensed psychologist with expertise in how learning and behavior are associated with the development of brain structures and systems. Formal testing of abilities such as memory and language skills assesses brain functioning. The pediatric neuropsychologist conducts the evaluation, interprets the test results, and makes recommendations.



Advocacy for Your Child: Knowledge is Power

Editor's note: Guest blogger Beth Walsh, MS, OTR/L is an educational advocate and consultant from Massachusetts. Here, she provides a professional educational advocate's perspective on how parents can make the Special Education system work for their children.

Congratulations!  If you’re reading this article, you are likely feeling worried, frustrated, maybe angry, and probably at least somewhat out-of-control.  So, why congratulations? Because you are taking an important step in your ongoing work in advocating for your son or daughter. Take a breath, because you are on the right path. As the English philosopher, Francis Bacon, said:  “Knowledge is power”.  By doing your research and reading this blog, you are empowering yourself by gathering critical information that will help your child.

Advocacy work is not easy - you know this - you’ve been at it on your own.  Parenting is not easy either. Having a child with learning differences or any type of disability, big or small, can make it even trickier. You may just be starting out…or you may not even know how to start out in negotiating the world of Special Education. You may not even know what your exact concern is for your child, but you are the parent- and YOU know that something is not going right.  Some of you may have been at this for years and might feel weary…. or furious.

 



Are You Cut Out to Parent A Child With Learning Differences?

Are you “cut out” or “counted in?”  As parents we want to be a positive influence when we help our children with homework or a daily life task. We want to know that we have not simply helped our child push through and get the assignment done, but more importantly, that our child has discovered something key about their strengths and challenges and that our child looks forward to returning to us for support with other challenges. As an Executive Function coach who has worked with many children with learning differences, I frequently hear parents express worry and uncertainty about helping too much or not enough.