Executive Function Strategies Blog

The Power of Small Experiments to Change Your Child's Study Habits

Think of a time when you tried to offer helpful advice to your child about the way they study. How did that go? If your kid is like most, you probably saw eye-rolling and heard heavy sighs of frustration in response to your useful tips. Why on earth does your kid refuse to take advantage of your years of experience and just listen to your sage advice about preparing for that test?



How to Memorize More Effectively (When Technology is Not an Option!)

Do you ever run into the grocery store with a short list in your head and leave with only half of what you went in for? Does your son have to memorize the names of the planets in order, numerical operations, science classifications, or the beaches of the Normandy D-Day invasion - and does he always forget one or two? Does your daughter “cram” the night before a vocabulary quiz by repeatedly reading over the list and then forget everything she “learned” the night before, at test time?



Reducing Test Anxiety While Preparing for Finals

Final exams are fast approaching, and your child may be teeming with text anxiety. But there’s good news! For the most part, students are simply reactivating old learning that happened over the past school year. They’re not cramming in a ton of new facts into their heads. Rather, students are dusting off those memories they’ve filed away. This week, we’re offering up a couple of our tastiest tips for helping your child prepare for final exams in a way that builds confidence and helps scale back that irksome test anxiety. Share these with your favorite finals-taker.



Study Tips for Final Exams: Identify the Blind Spots

First, we had “Fail” memes. These came in the form of pictures showing people, animals, and even inanimate objects failing at various things (see here). Then, the “Epic Fail” memes emerged. This caption was reserved for failures that were, well, really incredible on the fail scale (see here). Despite the fact that these memes encourage us to laugh at other people’s mistakes, I think they’ve actually done us some good: they’ve made making mistakes a thing. And once it’s a thing, we can get students to buy-in to the idea that we should spend more time talking about them (and eventually more time learning from them).