Executive Function Strategies Blog

5 Ways to Bring Peace and Positivity to Homework Battles

Editor’s note: This week, we feature guest blogger Joanna Robin, Ph.D., of Bright Parenting. Please read more about Joanna below. 

When kids struggle to do their homework, it can stir up so many emotions in parents. Maybe you were the type of student who got your homework done right away and you didn’t have anxiety about homework—until now, when you see your own child struggling. Or maybe you’re putting pressure on yourself to help your child stay on track because as an adult, you understand what’s at stake. You have the perspective to know that doing well academically can mean more opportunities for your kid later.  

And yet...you can’t force your child solve the math problem or complete the science lab.



Why You Should Stop Motivating Your Child (and what to do instead)

As parents, we often have high expectations for our kids. We are well aware of the hard work and self-starting attitudes they need that are the cornerstones of success in today’s world.  

So, what if you’re not seeing these behaviors and attitudes reflected in your kids? It’s only natural to feel concerned. If your child has trouble staying motivated, organized, and on top of things, they just need a little coaxing and incentive. Right?

Not necessarily.     



A Day in the Life: Parenting a Child with Executive Function Challenges

No matter what the age or disposition of your child, parenting is a tough job. Add Executive Function challenges to the mix and life can go from joy to confusion in a matter of minutes. 

If your child has Executive Function challenges, your entire day is a potential minefield of frustrating scenarios — but hold on, your friendly neighborhood Executive Function coach has some solutions for you to regain some calmness in your life!



4 Tips for Coping With Slow Processing Speed in Children

Editor's note: This week, we feature guest blogger Dr. Ellen Braaten, associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital. This is part two of her series on slow processing speed. Read her full bio below.